Why I Vote

By Anthony Arnold

As a person with a disability, why do I vote? Why does it matter?

I would like to credit a couple of teachers in school, who gave the class, as an assignment, to watch the local news and follow current events. This began my interest in what was happening locally and taught me that I was part of the community I had some say to what was happening.

Since World News comes on before local news, I got in the habit of watching that as well. World News expanded my knowledge of what was happening not only nationally and around the world, it exposed me to politics as well. I liked saying it was my eighth period of the school day, being I was learning. At times, I picked up so much information by watching the news, that it helped me to understand more of what I was also learning at school.

Through this exposure to politics, I learned as a person with a disability I should become familiar with the political aspect, and what is involved in creating policy. Let’s face it, my life depends on various policies, such as education, employment, health care, independent living, etc. I must have a say in each.

In addition to this, I learned what different politicians and political parties represented, and how they may help me as a person with a disability.

I have voted in every election since my eighteenth birthday, even if it has been only one measure. In recent years, I have voted early which typically has shorter lines. Being in North Dakota, you can’t count on the weather on election day.

When I get ready to vote, I spend time both on the internet and listening to different formats, trying to get up to speed on candidates and the issues.

At the polls, I use the machine, where it reads to me, I select my choice and then the machine marks the ballot and sends it back out to me. This offers a great feeling of independence. Every time I go, I feel liberated and like I am a part of society.

Thank you,

Anthony